The Righteous Mind by Jonathan Haidt

I recently read Jonathan Haidt’s the Righteous Mind, at a time that I was considering adding an extra dimension to my blog about my experiences growing up in a super conservative, evangelical family. I was partly inspired to do this by Tara Westover’s fabulous work “educated” about her experiences growing in a fundamentalist mormon family.

The Righteous mind outlines the basics of moral psychology and the differences between those who identify on the political right and those on the political left. It provides an interesting, modern critique of pure reason and society’s obsession with it.

Humans are not rational and rely on intuitions followed by post-hoc rationalisation, Haidt argues. The book goes on to provide a scaffold to potentially reducing misunderstanding and miscommunication across partisan divides. Haidt argues that there are six foundations to morality and liberals and conservatives give emphasis to different ones. This is based on the work that he and other researchers have been carrying out in this areas since the 1990s.

I found it’s defence of intuition and arguments against reason enlightening and thought provoking, and would highly recommend it to anyone interested in morality, religion, politics and the division they cause. I would also strongly recommend it to anyone teaching International Baccalaureate Theory of Knowledge.

It reminded me of the following resources that I have used in teaching TOK:

The following are quotes from the book that I enjoyed.

Page 6 1. Where does Morality come from?

“In other words the understanding of the conservation of volume wasn’t innate, and it wasn’t learned from adults. Kids figure it out for themselves, but only when their minds are ready and  they are given the right kids of experience.” Comment – Piaget’s reasoning makes sense but his studies were only of small children. If he was right surely mankind would have figured out the laws of the universe much sooner. His model cant apply in all adult learning and is inefficient.”

” If you want kids to learn about the social world…don’t force them to obey God or their teachers or you. That will only freeze them at the conventional level.”

I felt this one above provides some clue into understanding members of my family….that’s another story.

“These subjects were reasoning. They were working quite hard at reasoning. But it was not reasoning in search of truth; it was reasoning to support their emotional reactions.”

This is a good reminder of the difference between exploratory and confirmatory reasoning. I would argue that an important part of education is concerned with trying to help others develop ways to consider arguments from multiple perspectives.

The intuitive dog and its rational tail

“The true believers produce pious fantasies that don’t match reality, and at some point somebody comes along to knock the idol off its pedestal”.

Many christians will claim that something is wrong because God says it is wrong. Evangelicals claim supreme knowledge – they just know. I have been having arguments, with my siblings, about our faith and Brexit, that can be summed up by this quote.

“Yet moral judgements are not subjective statements; they are claims that somebody did something wrong. I can’t call for the community to punish you simply because I don’t like what you are doing. I have to point to something outside of my own preferences, and that pointing is moral reasoning”

All too often, people I regularly engage in discussion with, are making judgements and not offering anything more than their subjective preferences and they think that that is OK. Many Christians I know interpret the bible in whatever way pleases them at the time.

“The main way that we change our minds on moral issues is by interacting with other people. We are terrible at seeking evidence that challenges our own beliefs, but other people do us this favour, just as we are quite good at finding errors in other people’s beliefs.”

“But if there is affection, admiration, or a desire to please the other person, then the elephants leans toward that person and the rider tries to find the truth in the other person’s arguments”.

“The first principle of moral psychology is intuitions come first, strategic reasoning second.”

“If thinking is confirmatory rather than exploratory in these dry and easy cases, then what chance is there that people with think in an open-minded, exploratory way when self-interest, social identity and strong emotions makes them want or even need to reach a pre-ordained conclusion”

“The partisan brain has been reinforced so many times for performing mental contortions that free it from unwanted beliefs. Extreme partisanship may be literally addictive.”

“As an intuitionist, I’d say that the worship of reason is itself an illustration of one of the most long-lived delusions in Western history: the rationalist delusion”.

“Expertise in moral reasoning does not seem to improve moral behaviour, and it might make it worse….Anyone who values truth should stop worshipping reason….motivated reasoning (confirmatory reasoning vs exploratory)….depressing research findings make perfect sense once you see reasoning as having evolved not to help us find the truth but to help us engage in arguments, persuasion, and manipulation in the context of discussions with other people”.

“How hard could it be to teach students to look on the other side, to look for evidence against their favoured view? Yet, in fact, its very hard and nobody has found a way to do it.”

“Gut feelings are sometimes better guides than reasoning for making consumer choices and interpersonal judgements, but they are often disastrous as a basis for public policy, science and law. Rather, what I’m saying is that we must be wary of an individuals ability to reason. We should see each individual as being limited, like a neurone. A neurone is really good at one thing: summing up the stimulation coming into its dendrites to “decide” whether to fire an impulse along its axon.”

“I concluded by warning that the worship of reason, which is sometimes found in philosophical and scientific circles, is a delusion. It is an example of faith in something that does not exist.”

“The ethic of divinity is sometimes incompatible with compassion, egalitarianism, and basic human rights”.

“The Authority foundation, as I describe it, is borrowed directly from Fiske. It is more complex that the other foundations because its modules must look in two directions – up towards superiors and down towards subordinates”

Her Haidt provides an argument in support for the traditional teacher student relationships but also for leadership.

“Emphasising differences makes many people more racist, not less”

This quote reminds me of my twitter discussion with Alom Shah. I picked up on a statement he made about “all white people” and was promptly ridiculed by several of his followers. I still think that it is unhelpful to draw such lines in discussions of race. At the very least the work of Haidt shows that it is self defeating. If you are trying to reduce racism, you need to reduce division.

Thoughts from Mary Myatt’s Curriculum

At Easter this year I read Mary Myatt’s little book, Curriculum: Gallimaufry to coherence.

This is an excellent book, full of short, sharply written chapters that are bound to get you thinking about the wider narrative of your school curriculum. Now that the International Baccalaureate‘s Standard’s and Practice’s explicitly mention curriculum coherence, this would be recommended reading for any IB coordinator.

These are some of the questions that I asked myself, thoughts I had, or sections I highlighted as I read through the book:

  • Why is a rounded education good?
  • What is the aim of education?
  • Why is important to build links to TOK?
  • Where does my subject fit into the bigger picture of the curriculum?
  • What is the story of the school curriculum?
  • We need to avoid curriculum bittiness by thinking about the big picture – what is the essential ideas of what is being taught in lessons/units? e.g. biblical underpinnings of Macbeth taught in KS3 to inform the learning in KS4 of Macbeth
  • The primary purpose of CPD should be to ensure that teachers can hone their subject knowledge and their pedagogical content knowledge.
  • Schools should prioritise their teachers subject knowledge and pedagogical content knowledge development: school’s that don’t are like restaurant owners that don’t pay attention to their chef’s ingredients quality.
  • Skills are not separate to knowledge. Comprehension of one text does not guarantee comprehension of another.
  • What are the unifying ideas of each curriculum? – these are the ideas that come up again and again within subjects and between subjects.
  • Curriculum is a narrative, we need to get teachers out of their silo so that they can help students see how their subject learning fits in with others.
  • Structuring units via questions might be the right track to do this?
  • What is it that kids need to know in order to access the stuff we are teaching? This needs to be the focus of the vertical curriculum alignment.
  • During INSET time can we set objectives of what we wish depts to achieve in their planning time together?
  • Reducing workload isn’t about reducing work, it is about efficiency and time allocation. Work load is reduced so less is done with higher quality.
  • While I was reading I tweeted the question: “What is source material in the sciences?” and I got this reply:
  • This thinking about source material has made me think again about my approach to teaching IB Biology, but the question I was then struggling with was how to get students to effectively engage with that source material?
  • I got an idea to answer this question during my philosophy for children training. So now I think that while focusing on curriculum is good, and focussing on concepts and ideas is good we need to ensure that teachers are effectively trained to do this.
  • Learning happens when students are made to think about and with the material. This idea is repeated in the work of Daniel Willingham.
  • Observations of teaching – do I know where the best practice is?
  • Feedback is actionable, Grading is summative – both can be marking so long as we understand the point of the marking.
  • Class blog – when we start a topic, students write notes on what they already know about that topic. They can then identify what they are unsure of and finally what questions they have about the topic. The posts can be updated and revisited as students move through the unit/course.
  • There has been a lot of time wasted on differentiation. It labels and limits what students can do and narrows the achievement gap.
  • LOs as ticks on a checklist. Teacher ticks them off as they move through the syllabus. Instead we need to provide time for repetition. I would also add that a way to do this is move from learning objective to learning questions.
  • What is being taught and how to teach it well should be the focus of meetings. SLT to communicate expectations to middle leaders.
  • Learning should be authentic and link to real world issues and problems, and have some real world outcome if possible. Students work should be honoured, for the time and effort that they put into it.

Notes on Trivium 21c

Martin Robinson’s Trivium 21c was an absolute delight to read. Thought provoking and enlightening it presents an eloquently articulated history of the educational ideas and, through this radical history, a persuasive argument for the great synthesis of traditional and progressive teaching methods, united via the ancient arts of the trivium.

The trivium in teaching

The trivium of grammar, dialectic and rhetoric, originally used as the basis of the school curriculum in the middle ages are explored from a variety of different paradigms and meanings for Robinson to final expound his view of how this mantra could be utilised in modern schooling.

Grammar, Robinson argues, is not only the teaching of the rules of the language arts but is equivalent to the transmission of all of the basic facts and building blocks of knowledge that make up a particular discipline or subject. Grammar is also the transmission of the structure and rules of culture, which, of course, encompasses all the academic disciplines as well as other elements. To Robinson, modern grammarians are those of us on the traditionalist side of the great education debate on methods. Grammarians value knowledge and the methods best shown to help students gain this knowledge.

Dialectic, to Robinson, is the art of critiscm, skeptiscim and questioning of grammar. It is an art that needs to be taught in order to enable future adults to be able to think clearly about and with knowledge, in order to not simply be absorbers of knowledge but users and producers of it. Dialectic is important as it allows students to manipulate and use the knowledge acquired through grammar, by questioning it, reflecting on it and potentially rejecting or changing it. If grammar represents tradition, then dialectic represents progression; the dialecticians are those of us in education who aspire to the more progressive methods in the great educational debate.

The third art of the trivium, rhetoric, is the art of communication. Not only should learners be taught to acquire knowledge through grammar, taught to question it through dialectics but they should also be taught to communicate their thoughts through the arts of rhetoric.

Should the purpose of education serve the common good or enable someone to live a good life?

As someone who has moved from being deeply religious to being so no longer, I found myself agreeing with Robinson’s sentiments that curiosity is not best served by prejudice and that teachers must not model the closed mind of someone who thinks there is only one path that leads to meaning or, I guess, truth. In this vein he asks us to attempt to live, as teachers, with the uncertain position of holding the traditional and the progressive together, investigating ideas from across the range of opinion.

Robinson asks if all teachers in any given school understand the narrative of a the curriculum? He argues that only by seeing how their part fits into the wider curriculum can teachers deliver an education to students that allows them to be knowledgable, critical and reflective. He claims that students must learn the unifying concepts, the concepts that come up again and again, of each discipline again and again. This put me in mind of Thomas Khun who claimed that expertise as a scientist only arrives through exposure to many examples. Scientists are experts because they have been able to generalise from the many specific examples and they apply this knowledge in new scenarios.

Robinson also claims that teachers must move away from omniscience, which reminded me of an early career conversation a chemistry teacher who claimed that not knowing in a teacher is a sign of weakness, and that students don’t like it. I agree with Robinson that all teachers need to honest about what society doesn’t know, they need to embrace the uncertainty in their discipline.

A good teacher has mastered the core knowledge and more of their discipline as well as holding an appreciation of what society doesn’t yet know in their field.

We need to understand that teachers should have the authority to teach but recognise that all knowledge is probable and uncertain.

Teachers should use language in such a way that ensures uncertainty has its place.

Robinson’s book draws on many sources and aside from his main argument is highly informative of the history of educational ideas. His arguments are compelling and interesting but the book is worth reading not only for this but also for your education in the history of educational ideas that it draws upon. This book has helped me begin to see the synthesis of the progressive and traditional narratives and has got me wondering about how I can go about making argumentation an important part of my biology classroom in the second stage of the trivium. How can I use debate to really challenge kids to think and learn all sides of an argument? How can I introduce students to the, Dissoi Logoi in science, the art of seeing both sides of an argument as true within their contexts. Instead of dialectic argument as being right vs wrong we can make both as right. Dual thinking explores the possibility that both sides can be right.

My reads by year

Through the threshold library

My reads by year

A list of the all the books I have read each year.

2019

  1. Trivium 21c – by Martin Robinson
  2. Prisoners of Geography – by Tim Marshall
  3. The Left Hand of Darkness – by Ursula Le Guin
  4. I am Pilgrim – by Terry Hayes
  5. The Handmaid’s Tale – by Margaret Attwood
  6. Slaughter House 5 – by Kurt Vonnegut
  7. A Wizard of Earthsea – by Ursula Le Guin
  8. The Tombs of Atuan – by Ursula Le Guin
  9. The Farthest Shore – by Ursula Le Guin
  10. Tales from Earthsea – by Ursula Le Guin
  11. The Other Wind – by Ursula Le Guin
  12. The Three-Body Problem – by Cixin Liu
  13. The Righteous Mind – by Jonathan Haidt
  14. The Curriculum – Gallimaufry to coherence – by Mary Myatt
  15. School Leadership and education system reform – edited by Peter Earley and Toby Greany
  16. Rocannan’s World – by Ursula Le Guin
  17. Planet of Exile – by Ursula Le Guin
  18. City of Illusions – by Ursula Le Guin
  19. The Word for World is Forest – by Ursula Le Guin
  20. Single & Single – John Le Carré
  21. How the World Thinks: A Global History of Philosophy – Julian Baggini
  22. The Coddling of the American Mind – Greg Lukinoff and Jonathan Haidt
  23. Blueprint: How DNA makes us who we are – Robert Plomin
  24. The New Silk Roads – Peter Frankopan
  25. The Paper Menagerie – Ken Liu

2018

  1. What is this thing called knowledge? – by Duncan Pritchard. Read as part of Oxford Universities online CPD course – theory of knowledge
  2. Epistemology: Contemporary readings – edited by Michael Huemer
  3. What if everything you knew about education was wrong? – by David Didau – my review.
  4. Cleverlands – by Lucy Crehan
  5. Seven myths about education – by Daisy Christodoulou
  6. Making good progress? – by DaisyChristodoulou
  7. Why knowledge matters: rescuing our children from failed educational theories – by E.D. Hirsch
  8. Ouroboros –  by Greg Ashman
  9. What does this look like in the classroom? – by Carl Hendrick and Robin MacPherson
  10. The Sword of Honour Trilogy – by Evelyn Waugh
  11. Millionaire Teacher – by Andrew Hallam
  12. Sapiens: A Brief History of Humankind – by Yuval Noah Harari
  13. Millionaire Expat – by Andrew Hallam
  14. Tiger Head, Snake Tails: China today, how it got there and why it has to change – by Jonathan Fenby
  15. A parent’s guide to raising kids Overseas (Volume 1) – by Jeff Devens
  16. Homo Deus: a brief history of tomorrow – by Yuval Noah Harari
  17. Fierce conversations: achieving success in work and in life, one conversation at a time – by Susan Scott
  18. The first 90 days, updated and expanded; proven strategies for getting up to speed faster and smarter – by Michael D. Watkins
  19. 21 lessons for the 21st Century – by Yuval Noah Harari
  20. Fahrenheit 451 – by Ray Bradbury
  21. Brave new world – by Aldous Huxley
  22. This is going to hurt – by Adam Kay
  23. Educated – Tara Westover

2017

  1. Raising babies – by Steve Biddulph
  2. A brief history of everyone who ever lived – by Adam Rutherford
  3. Patient H.M. – by Luke Dittrich
  4. The Serengeti rules – by Sean Carroll
  5. Battle hymn of the tiger teachers: the Michaela way – edited by Katherine Birbalsingh
  6. American Gods – by Neil Gaiman
  7. Neverwhere – by Neil Gaiman
  8. How the Marquis got his coat back – by Neil Gaiman
  9. Stardust – by Neil Gaiman
  10. The ocean at the end of the lane – by Neil Gaiman
  11. Anansi boys – by Neil Gaiman
  12. The rise and fall of D.O.D.O – by Neil Stephenson and Nicole Galland
  13. What every teacher needs to know about psychology – by David Didau and Nick Rose
  14. How to stop time – by Matt Haig
  15. Why don’t students like school? – by Daniel Willingham
  16. Coraline – by Neil Gaiman
  17. The graveyard book – by Neil Gaiman
  18. Fragile things – by Neil Gaiman
  19. Smoke and mirrors – by Neil Gaiman
  20. His Dark Materials: The complete trilogy – by Philip Pullman
  21. Trigger Warning – by Neil Gaiman
  22. Norse Mythology – by Neil Gaiman
  23. Good Omens – by Neil Gaiman and Terry Pratchett

2016

  1. How to raise an adult – by Julie Lythcott-Haims – my review.
  2. What is the point of school? – by Guy Claxton
  3. Making thinking visible – by Ron Richhardt – my review.
  4. Aping mankind – by Raymond Tallis
  5. Getting Darwin wrong – by Brendan Wallace
  6. The problems of philosophy – by Bertrand Russell
  7. Why evolution is true – by Jerry Coyne
  8. Faith vs fact – by Jerry Coyne
  9. Seven Storey Mountain – by Thomas Merton
  10. Seveneves – by Neal Stephenson
  11. Never let me go – by Kazuo Ishiguro
  12. What is the point of school – by Guy Claxton
  13. Being Mortal: Illness, Medicine and What Matters in the End – by Atul Gawande
  14. Religion for Atheists – by Alain de Botton
  15. The Remains of the day – by Kazuo Ishiguro
  16. Fireflies – by Shiva Naipaul
  17. The Young Atheist’s Handbook: Lessons for living a good life without God – by Alom Shaha
  18. Justice – Michael Sandel
  19. The vital question: why is life the way it is? – by Nick Lane

2015

  1. The brain at school: educational neuroscience in the classroom – by John Geake
  2. Classroom-based research and evidence-based practice – by Keith Taber
  3. Ways of learning: learning theories and learning styles in the classroom – by Alan Pritchard
  4. Pedagogy of the oppressed – by Paolo Freire
  5. Visible learning for teachers – by John Hattie
  6. Thinking, fast and slow – by Daniel Kahneman
  7. Raising girls – by Steve Biddulph
  8. Full catastrophe living – by Jon Kabat Zinn
  9. The moral landscape – by Sam Harris
  10. A Universe from nothing – by Laurence Krauss

2014

  1. Good work – by Howard Gardner, Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi, and William Damon
  2. Intelligence reframed – by Howard Gardner
  3. Contemporary theories of learning – by Knud Illeris
  4. Teaching as if life matters – by Christopher Uhl
  5. Nonviolent Communication – by Marshall Rosenberg
  6. The last child in the woods – by Richard Louv
  7. The sixth extinction: an unnatural history – by Elizabeth Kolbert
  8. Neanderthal man – by Svante Paabo
  9. The serpents promise – by Steve Jones
  10. The language of life – by Francis Collins
  11. Creation: the origin of life/the future of life – by Adam Rutherford
  12. Your inner fish – by Neil Shubin
  13. Life Ascending – by Nick Lane
  14. The Baroque cycle (3 books) – by Neal Stephenson
  15. The magic of reality – by Richard Dawkins

Earlier

  1. Bad Science – by Ben Goldacre
  2. Thirteen things that don’t make sense – by Michael Brooks
  3. The immortal life of Henrietta Lacks – by Rebecca Skloot
  4. The rational optimist – by Matt Ridley
  5. Quantum evolution: the new science of life – by Johnjoe Mcfadden
  6. The diversity of life – by E.O. Wilson
  7. Impossibility – by John Barrow
  8. Collapse – by Jared Diamond
  9. The self illusion – by Bruce Hood
  10. The selfish gene – by Richard Dawkins
  11. Genome – by Matt Ridley
  12. The secret life of trees – by Colin Tudge
  13. The man who mistook his wife for a hat – Oliver Sacks
  14. The Handmaid’s tail – by Margaret Atwood
  15. The Inheritors – by William Golding
  16. The Baroque cycle – by Neal Stephenson
  17. The greatest show on earth – by Richard Dawkins
  18. The song of the Dodo – by David Quammen
  19. The lives of a cell – by Lewis Thomas
  20. Fifty ideas you really need to know – by Hayley Birch
  21. The violinists thumb – by Sam Keen
  22. All the Evelyn Waugh novels and travel writing
  23. Game of thrones

Review: Making Thinking Visible

I recently read part one and part three of Ritchhart et al’s 2011 book “Making thinking visible”. The book espouses a methodology for promoting thinking in students and for making that student thinking visible in the work that we do as educators and is broken into three parts.

Part one deals with the philosophy, terminology and theory of putting thinking at the centre of the classroom experience for students; part two details specific strategies that can be used to promote thinking; while part three deals with advice on how to get the most out of these strategies in the classroom.

I have struggled with this question in my own professional practice for a couple of years now. How do you balance, with the limited time you have in class, the need to develop the thinking skills used in the process of doing science with the need to develop knowledge of the content?

I can think of many conversations with colleagues where we have debated this. Often the running theme amongst science teachers in my experience has been that the content is king; that student needs the building blocks that the content gives them in order develop that deeper understanding of more complex science. You can’t just jump into redox reactions and the electron transport chain if students don’t have some understanding already to work with.

Often this has been levelled as a critique against the whole idea of inquiry teaching, the philosophical backbone of the IB. In science class how can you reasonably expect a G8 student to uncovering understanding that has literally taken scientists 400 years to develop?

Often-times science is taught in spiral way; students meet similar topics through middle and high school and each time they go into more depth. This allows students to construct understanding piece by piece year by year.

This book lays a clear challenge to that type of thinking but goes further by actually providing practical steps and examples of the types of questions teachers should be asking to develop students thinking. Undoubtably developing thinking skills in our students is one of the most important things we can be doing as teachers as these skills are inter-disciplinary and underpin lifelong learning. If you know how you can learn anything.

Thus as science teachers we need to examine why we do what we do and think more cleverly about how we use our time. After all, as this book highlights, quality in education is about developing dispositions and habits of mind, not simply high grades on exams with content that is then forgotten.

Students need to see us as learners and thinker, modelling those attitudes and valuing them. learning often occurs through reflecting on mistakes. This can be a challenge in schools where the culture sets the teacher in centre stage. I remember an ex-colleague once saying to me that if he ever admitted to not knowing something then his students would lose all their confidence and trust in him.

Part one of this book details the steps to making thinking visible through modelling an interest in ideas, constructing understanding, facilitating and clarifying thinking all through questioning, listening and documenting.

Ritchhart focusses on asking questions that model an interest in ideas, construct understanding and facilitate and clarify thinking. The key is to ask authentic questions; questions to which the answer is not predetermined, and to elicit these questions from the students as well.

Questions that model an interest an ideas set the classroom culture and allow students to see teachers as learners. Essential questions fall into this category. Questions that construct understanding are ones that guide, direct and push student’s understanding forward of the big ideas and concepts. “constructive questions frame the intellectual endeavors in which students are to be engaged and point them toward uncovering fundamental ideas and principles that aid understanding. Questions that clarify and facilitate thinking enable learners to get what is in their heads out and into the teachers. For example asking students “what makes you say that?” instead of simply responding to a comment will give you insight into how the student is thinking.

We need to learn to identify the key ideas and concepts with which we want our students to struggle and engage instead of just covering the curriculum and judging our success by how much we get through. This will enable us to put students in charge of their own learning and progress not merely providing them with material for the test.

We need to draw our attention to what types of thinking we want to foster in the classroom and what we think thinking actually is. We need to highlight thinking when it occurs in class. Until students can name a process they cannot control it.

As well as questioning, listening and documenting are highlighted as essential parts of the process. Modelling listening, a vigorous and interested attention in what the other is saying, is essential for modelling group interactions for students, showing them how to work collaboratively. Documenting as well as providing evidence of the thinking that is taking place should also act as a stimulus to drive the thinking forward.

Part two introduces the reader to a set of thinking routines that are grouped as to their purpose in the type of thinking they are trying to develop. Each routine contains detailed instructions for its use and clear examples on how to deploy it. Routines are not intended to be used as stand alone activities but as repeated structures in the classroom that students can eventually gain mastery of themselves.

I haven’t yet read part two yet as I didn’t feel the time for me would right until I had spent sometime addressing challenges that part one put before me. Once I have reflected on the types of thinking that I wish to elicit in my classroom then I will plough on into part two.

Part three provides useful case studies of from teachers using these routines over time, providing an excellent guide on how to bring these routines to life.

I was once again reminded of the usefulness of mindfulness in teaching practice. Mindfulness reminds us to remain in the present with attention and this is essential for all of these skills of questioning, listening and documenting and being able to respond to our students.

This book is certainly one every teacher should read, as it provides some excellently researched food for thought about what we are doing in our day to day as educators. Are we placing thinking, and the development of thinking skills at the centre of the learning experience of our students? or are we more focussed on content and assessment?

Got me asking:

  • Is memorisation and rote practice ever useful?
  • Don’t people need to train and doesn’t training involve practice and isn’t practice often rote learning?
  • What types of thinking do we want to encourage today?
  • What types of thinking do we want to encourage in science? What types are valuable to scientists?
  • How to balance the need for content knowledge vs thinking skills especially when curriculums are so broad and time is so short and universities expect a certain level of knowledge in undergrads?
  • What is a quality education?
  • What types of adults are we trying to develop?
  • What are the essential concepts in Biology identified in the literature of teaching biology?
  • What essential questions are we trying to ask in science/Biology class?
  • What routines do I want to use in my classroom?
  • What does our schools mission and vision say about thinking?
  • How can I incorporate more non-written, non-verbal reflection into my students learning?
  • What expectations do I set in my learning environments?
  • Is shorter lessons a good thing to promote deeper thinking?
  • How useful is individualization in developing understanding and advancing deep learning?
  • What are the essential questions to propel learning in Biology?
  • How do these change and morph through a teaching unit?